Under Review

Rae Spoon

Love is a Hunter

Saved by Radio

Review by Slavko Bucifal


Rae Spoon - Love is a Hunter
Rae Spoon – Love is a Hunter

Death By Elektro

Metaphorical monsters in your closet, late night dance clubs, complexities of transgendered culture and the desire for love on many levels are themes that permeate Rae Spoon’s Love is a Hunter, which is due to be released mid-August. While there are indie pop gems like “We Can’t Be Lovers with These Guns on Each Other,” which will have you singing and dancing in the wee hours, the album’s foundation continues Rae Spoon’s tradition of honest and reflective music. Love is a Hunter furthers this country musician’s experimentation into electro dance music by blending beats and pops of synth sounds with beautiful folk tunes. The album moves from “danceables“ such as “You Can Dance” and “Danger, Danger Danger” (described in the press release as a “glitter-splashed queer anthem”) to stripped-down country folk songs.

In the lead track, “Death by Electro,” Spoon is armed with an acoustic guitar, a flute sound and his delicate yet powerful voice. He poignantly describes the appeal of late nights at the Disco with a tune worthy of folk stages everywhere. It is a fitting start to the album and a reminder of the roots of his music. “Lighthouse” will speak to frustrated lovers everywhere with lyrics like: “Do me a favour/ and take a day/ to build a lighthouse/ so I can stay out of your way.” The idea of love being unwanted but inevitable presents an interesting perspective in the title track of the album, and it is a further example of the depth and quality of Spoon’s writing.

Love is a Hunter is a complete record that flourishes when listened to in its entirety, yet has stand out tracks primed for a mixtape. The lyrics are dark and celebrate the fragility, triumph and diversity of culture and life. Spoon’s voice is magical and complements the electro blips and beeps with acoustic and indie pop sounds. Overall, this a meaningful and endearing record following the success of his previous Polaris Prize nomination.