Under Review

rhclue

Rhucle

Wonderland

Beer On the Rug; 08/03/2017

author
Nathan Pike

Tokyo’s Yuta Kudo is one busy man. Covering a wide range of mediums, be it photography, painting or sculpture, his artistic output rarely slows down. His musical project, titled Rhucle, seems the perfect companion and balance to these artistic leanings. In fact, I found it quite nice to look through his gallery of published work while listening to this latest offering of music, titled Wonderland.

Kudo’s images project a feeling of calm and peace. Whether abstract swirls of colour on canvas or photographs of nature and urban surroundings, his work is pointed and serves its purpose well. And so it is with Rhucle’s music. While defined as chillwave or even ambient, a term Kudo himself dismisses, Rhucle reaches a bit deeper than simple terms of genre. Rather, these songs are closer to field recordings or soundscapes. It is the music that might play in the back of your head while taking a stroll through the forest or a quiet neighbourhood. And while the music he makes with the electronics at his disposal is pretty, it would be wholly incomplete without the lovely real-life sounds that accompany it.


Water, for instance, plays a strong role in Kudo’s work, both in his images and music. Wonderland is no exception with it’s eigh gently sprawling tunes that bring to mind my favourite rustic places of recharge and contemplation. Ultimately, Rhcule’s music provides a reminder to slow down and absorb one’s surroundings. The songs flow into one another with grace and differ only slightly. There are no bangers or ballads to be found here. Instead, you are treated to an even keeled energy that envelops you in warm serenity, acting as a calming agent to the end of a long day, a jump off point to meditation, or perhaps a soothing candlelit soak in the tub.

Music doesn’t have to be ripe with hooks and catchy melodies to be effective. Sometimes the simplest of movements are more than enough to inspire emotion, and Rhucle’s deliciously serene musical paintings prove this point. Each song acts as a healing balm for your ears, brain, and spirit.