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princesscenturyrendezvous

Princess Century

Rendezvous

Paper Bag; 26/03/2016

author
Christine Powell

Work goes late so you have barbecue chips for dinner. You weren’t sure you were up for a night out but now you’re giddy. Up some stairs, into a room heavy with fog and bodies. People are in the dark or glowing red, pink, green. Find your friend. You have room to dance, like really dance.

You’re in the mood for an darkwave night, a Rendezvous in quiet hours. Prolific Maya Postepksi dishes out another Princess Century goodie when you haven’t yet tired of last month’s remix. Rendezvous is a short trio of tracks with too much dancefloor intensity for 2015’s cool, airy Progress. Postepski’s beats belong on a European dance floor but suit any dark, throbbing room just fine.

“Robber” hits you and yes, this is what you came for. The mood is eerie and appetizing. It renders movement. Unrest drips onto your shoulders and down your back. You’re sinister and there’s an urgency to the groove you’re working. No one takes a cigarette break.

That fog sits on your burnt skin, cool and thick. Rendezvous continues with “Wet.” The throbbing beat grips you and leaves you into a maze. You escape towards the satin pulse of the music. Nervous energy keeps you awake and your movements taut. She leads you dancing with acquaintances, people you didn’t know were fun.

“Rendezvous” — it’s the last song and you have to wake up in a few hours. Build up to the drop lasts two minutes and the wait puts you in a frantic daze. Sirens? A laughing dolphin? It’s so funny, it’s so fun. The synth wiggles and fades. Why are you alone? Who cares. You don’t catch feelings.

Rendezvous is a soundscape with beats reminiscent of the supremo, retro techno of the 80’s. The album and the moment are brief.  When you leave, you say bye to the stranger-friends. It’s understood that the relationship ends with the night, but the evening’s parallel play created intimacy.