bg1-1024x670

The Jazz Show – Listings, Winter 2017/2018

Author

Tune in to the Jazz Show with Gavin Walker every Monday night,
9pm-Midnight.

December 4th, 2017
For this and next Monday’s show the Jazz Feature will be music from the soundtrack of two iconic movies both of which have nothing to do with Jazz but used Jazz music to enhance the film. The first is music from the film that introduced the great Michael Caine to the world. The movie was the original version of “Alfie” in which Caine plays a likeable cad who finds his nemesis and reassesses his life. The score was composed and played by the great tenor saxophonist Sonny Rollins with a small orchestra arranged and conducted by Oliver Nelson. In addition to Sonny Rollins’ music, we’ll hear the great Bert Bacharach tune entitled “Alfie” that was also part of the movie, played by Rahsaan Roland Kirk to cap off the Jazz Feature.

December 11th, 2017:
Tonight’s Jazz Feature is from a French suspense classic entitled “Ascenseur Pour L’echafaud” (Elevator to the Scaffold”) and the score was composed and played by Miles Davis. Davis watched the scenes  that required music and in a few days had put together what he wanted to play for the film. His genius shines through and he contributes some of his most haunting and expressive trumpet playing on the soundtrack. Miles is accompanied by the great American ex-pat drummer Kenny Clarke and three accomplished French musicians. Barney Wilen on tenor saxophone, Rene Urtreger on piano and Pierre Michelot on bass. The film was very good but the music was amazing!

December 18th, 2017:
As this is our last show before Christmas and our final one for 2017, The Jazz Show will present some fine Christmas Jazz that you won’t hear in shopping malls. A whole variety of great Jazz stars will be on tap and of course Lord Buckley and his twisted version of “The Story of Scrooge”. All this and more and best wishes for a wonderful Holiday Season from myself, Gavin Walker and The Jazz Show. We return on January 8, 2018.

January 8th, 2017

Happy New Year to all fans of The Jazz Show!  In November last we featured albums that were given dismissive ratings by the Jazz critics and yet became classics. This month we are featuring albums that got raves from the critics and became Jazz classics. All of the Jazz Features this month got 5 out of 5 stars. We begin with tenor saxophonist Dexter Gordon’s own favourite album of his work. Dexter is in swaggering form and is accompanied by an amazing rhythm section. Sonny Clark on piano, Butch Warren on bass and smilin’ Billy Higgins on drums. Mr. Gordon recorded scads of records but this one is on top. Blue Note issued it and it’s called simply “Go!”

January 15th, 2017:
Bassist/composer Charles Mingus recorded so many amazing and always different albums but this one ranks as one of his finest. It was and remains his best selling album as well. The whole album is wonderfully programmed and even though all of the compositions are very different from one another, it plays like a suite and covers a huge spectrum of musical colours. The Mingus Jazz Workshop assembled here was one of his most cohesive units. This album represented a breakthrough for Mingus as it earned critical acclaim and enhanced his status as one of America’s most important innovators. The album was entitled “Mingus-Ah-Um” and was issued on Columbia Records.

January 22nd, 2017:
Alto and tenor saxophone master Sonny Stitt made many recordings usually with him as the solo horn with piano, bass and drums. Many were great but this date called “Personal Appearance” is more than just “another fine Sonny Stitt date”. Stitt is on fire here and clearly inspired on every tune. Stitt was a player not a composer and his repertoire consisted of thousands of tunes plus his own variations on the blues. Stitt’s band kicks him up to top notch. Sonny is backed by Bobby Timmons on piano, Edgar Willis on bass and Kenny Dennis on drums. All young energetic players. Boss saxophone here!

January 29th, 2017:
Tonight’s Jazz Feature puts Miles Davis’ trumpet with the orchestra arranged and conducted by Gil Evans. This album called “Miles Ahead” was the first full feature of their musical relationship. There is a touch of genius in the inspired playing of Davis and the unique orchestrations of Gil Evans that has to be heard to be believed. Once again programming counts here as the 10 separate pieces combine and are segued together in the form of a gorgeous suite. The critics and Davis’ fans raved about this album and it stands as a pinnacle for both.